Start-ups: Creating Your Customer Journey

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Jared Orr
Jared Orr Member, CS Leader Posts: 52 Expert
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edited November 2020 in Metrics & Analytics
It's no question that creating a quality customer journey is critical for any business. But the businesses that implement it quicker will be better off in the long run, in my opinion. 

When start-ups are constructing a customer journey, here are 3 questions I recommend asking:
  1. If I could put 100 of my niche customers in one place for 60 seconds, what would I want to say to them to get them interested in my product or service?
  2. If every new client had 24 hours to use my product or service before they could get a full refund, what would I do within those 24 hours to get them to sign on for another 3 months?
  3. If every client that signed on for 3 months could get a full refund after their term was done, what would I do within those first 3 months to ensure they see long-term value in my product or service?
What are your thoughts on this? Do you have first-hand experience with creating a start-up customer journey? 

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Jared Orr

Customer Success Whisperer

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  • Heather Leventry
    Heather Leventry Member Posts: 5 Seeker
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    edited November 2020
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    Doesn't it start with creating a customer persona and going from there? New at this but I really like Design Thinking - Empathy Maps for this purpose. We did the empathy mapping at an Association where I worked and it helped us see ways we could create a better member experience at conferences. Currently working on one.
    #customerjourney #designthinking #customerexperience
  • Anita Toth
    Anita Toth Member Posts: 246 Expert
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    edited December 2020
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    @Jared Orr  CSM Practice has an amazing video on how to do this, step-by-step. They even have their client explain what the process was like for them and the results they got (the client was really happy with the process and outcome).


    Here's the link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FhfjufCU6lA

  • Jared Orr
    Jared Orr Member, CS Leader Posts: 52 Expert
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    edited December 2020
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    Just watched it. Thank you for sharing, Anita!

    Jared Orr

    Customer Success Whisperer

  • Anita Toth
    Anita Toth Member Posts: 246 Expert
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    edited December 2020
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    @Jared Orr  Yay! I hope it helped. I found it to be a very good resource.
  • David Ellin
    David Ellin Member Posts: 170 Expert
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    edited December 2020
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    Here are some additional thoughts in addition to the great responses provide thus far.

    1. Keep changing hats (perspectives) when developing your journey maps. It's ok to start building the journey map from your company's perspective - what experiences you want them to have. However, if you don't switch hats and look at the journey map from your customer's perspective, you'll miss critical steps - typically around handoffs.

    2. Build your map, step away from it for a few days, then come back and review it ago. You'll realize all the steps you missed the first time.

    3. Make certain that your journey map aligns with your corporate culture. If your culture is P&L driven, having a customer-first journey map is unrealistic.

    4. Collaborate cross-functionally before finalizing your journey map. Make sure every department that touches the customer along the journey has input into the journey map and aligns their behavior. You can't prescribe how you want a department to treat a customer without their buy-in.

    5. Make sure the journey is consistent. There's nothing worse for a customer than having parts of the company treat them well and others fall very short. To be successful, the journey should be consistent.

    6. Once you feel you've nailed it, put on your customer hat once more and take yourself through the journey from their perspective. Fill in the gaps as appropriate.

    7. Finally, once you really feel you've nailed it, review the journey map with a few customers. They'll tell you what you've missed.